Past Issues

Edithvale Wetlands at Risk

The Edithvale Wetlands may be at risk according to two consultants report. Chosen to review the Government’s preferred option in the level crossing removal programme the report states that trenching required for the rail line may cause groundwater to build up. This will have to be disposed of, by Melbourne Water pumping water to the Ramsar listed wetlands, or elsewhere, which in turn could alter water levels causing detriment to vegetation used by birds for nesting or if the water becomes acidic or saline this could also harm bird life.

Report: Groundwater Preliminary Impacts – Ecological Assessment – Rail Under Road – Edithvale & Bonbeach (PDF, 3.8MB)

Mordialloc Bypass

What is proposed is that traffic using Wells Road will be encouraged to use the bypass which will impact severely instead on Aspendale Gardens residents to the south east of Mordialloc Creek, Waterways residential estate and destroy the most important wetlands in the southwest corner of Braeside Park. Unfortunately an elevated six lane freeway will be close to Braeside Park, cross over Governor Road, through the wetlands close to Waterways housing, across Mordialloc Creek abutting Aspendale Gardens housing. Drilling is underway in the wetlands for the piles required for an elevated roadway. If it goes ahead the bypass will destroy the peace and quiet of Braeside Park, residential housing and the birdlife in the wetlands. Braeside park and wetlands which in 1978 Metropolitan Melbourne Board of Works was determined to preserve for future generations.

Residents in Dingley are concerned about this development as are Moorabbin residents because of the impact that the proposed freeway will have on the already heavily congested South Road where it enters the Nepean Highway in Moorabbin.  The northern section of the bypass will connect to South Road at Warrigal Road. South Road already carries very heavy traffic to connect with Nepean Highway in Moorabbin. There are viable alternatives for the bypass such as a linking road to Springvale Road further to the north.

The proposed route can be viewed through the Social PinPoint at VicRoads.

Re: Foreign Ownership of Agricultural Land and Water Rights

Letter to:

 

Bill Shorten MP,
Assistant Treasurer,
Federal Labor Party,
Parliament House,
Canberra, ACT 2600

Dear Sir,

It is pleasing to note that at last the Coalition and Greens are prepared to join in a Senate Inquiry into foreign investment and sale of agricultural farm land by forming a rural affairs and transport committee to check on how the natural interest test is applied to agricultural land and agri-businesses purchased by foreign companies and foreign sovereign funds.

Continue reading »

Sustainable Population Strategy, Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities

In responding to long-term physical implications of net overseas migration to Australia it is proposed to address the impact of increased population on the natural and built environment in the following areas:

  • scarcity of water resources through climate change
  • loss of agricultural land through urban expansion and mining
  • loss of biodiversity

Continue reading »

Submission to the Channel Deepening Project for Port Phillip Bay

Author: Mary Rimington

Victoria’s coasts are precious and locations like Port Phillip Bay are an intensively used environment. Activity and processes on the coast, inland in the catchment, and off shore in the ocean, have an influence on the health and sustainability of the coastal environment.

In view of the well documented evidence of sea level rise, the availability of alternatives, and the adverse environmental impact, we are opposed to the deepening of the Rip and dredging of the South Channel to allow larger container vessels entry to Port Phillip Bay.

Our objection to the deepening of the Rip is based on the fact that there is now sound evidence of sea level rise as a result of climate change, and that even a 1-2 cm rise in tide levels will intensify the beach erosion and flooding already occurring on the eastern, most vulnerable side of Port Phillip Bay.

Continue reading »